Myles Braithwaite


Top 40 Songs of 2011

You can purchase this playlist on iTunes or stream it on Rdio.

  1. The Answer Was You / Sloan
  2. Welcome / Hey Rosetta!
  3. Shoot Out Sparks / The Swallows
  4. It / Rich Aucoin
  5. Heaven's Just for Moviemakers / Graham Wright
  6. Colours / Grouplove
  7. Blue Eyes / Destroyer
  8. To Carry Many Small Things / Mina Tindle
  9. Let's Win! / Alexander
  10. The Stand / Mother Mother
  11. Soviet Race / Graham Wright
  12. If Raymond Carver Were Born In the '90s / Library Voices
  13. Jimmie's Still Jimmie / Joel Plaskett
  14. Reaction / Acres Of Lions
  15. Your Daddy Will Do / Sloan
  16. Rolling In the Deep / Adele
  17. Video Games / Lana Del Rey
  18. Mission Bells / Armistice
  19. The Golden Age / The Asteroids Galaxy Tour
  20. Nostalgia / The Burning Hell
  21. Chapel Song / We Are Augustines
  22. Adieu / Cur de pirate
  23. The Cowboys' Christmas Ball / The Killers
  24. Green Thumb / Sunparlour Players
  25. Bad Ritual / Timber Timbre
  26. What a Little Moonlight Can Do / Boy and Bean
  27. Comeback Kid (That's My Dog) / Brett Dennen
  28. The Prime Minister's Daughter / Library Voices
  29. Post-War Blues / Dan Mangan
  30. Cruel Thing to Do / Peter Elkas
  31. Pop Goes the World (Men Without Hats) / The Burning Hell
  32. Owen Sound / Elliott BROOD
  33. She's Thunderstorms / Arctic Monkeys
  34. Book Club / Arkells
  35. Paradise / Coldplay
  36. Queen of Hearts / Fucked Up
  37. Who Are You? / Kathryn Calder
  38. Healthy Hands (Will Mourn You) / Tasseomancy
  39. One for You, One for Me / Bright Eyes
  40. Oh Fortune / Dan Mangan



Apple’s Hidden Dropbox Competitor

It looks like Apple hide a Dropbox-like folder in iCloud:

If you want to try out the trick yourself, make sure "Documents And Data" is turned on within iCloud settings, then navigate to Library inside your Home folder, and then find Mobile Documents.

Then, throw some files into the folder. These files should sync to any Macs where you're signed in using the same iCloud credentials.

Right click to create an "alias" of the Mobile Documents folder on your desktop, and you're good to go.

(via Clayton Morris)


I made this simple python script today to get an OPML file so I can import all my Twitter lists.

#!/usr/bin/env python

__version__ = '0.1'
__project_name__ = 'TwitterListOPML'
__project_link__ = 'https://gist.github.com/1051517'

TWITTER_LISTS_URL = "http://api.twitter.com/1/%(username)s/lists.json"
TWITTER_LIST_FEED_URL = "http://api.twitter.com/1/%(username)s/lists/%(list)s/statuses.atom"
TWITTER_LIST_HTML_URL = "http://twitter.com/%(username)s/%(list)s"

OPML_START = """<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<!-- OPML generated by TwitterListOPML -->
<opml version="1.1">
    <head>
        <title>Twitter Lists</title>
    </head>
    <body>
        <outline text="Twitter Lists" title="Twitter Lists">"""
OPML_END = """      </outline>
    </body>
</opml>"""

OPML_OUTLINE_FEED = '<outline text="%(title)s" title="%(title)s" type="rss" version="RSS" htmlUrl="%(html_url)s" xmlUrl="%(xml_url)s" />'

import sys
import urllib2

try:
    import json
except ImportError:
    import simplejson as json

def get_lists(url):
    request = urllib2.Request(url)
    request.add_header('User-Agent', '%s/%s +%s' % (
        __project_name__, __version__, __project_link__
    ))
    opener = urllib2.build_opener()
    data = opener.open(request).read()
    return json.loads(data)

def main(username):
    t_lists = get_lists(TWITTER_LISTS_URL % {'username': username})

    print OPML_START

    for t_list in t_lists['lists']:
        list_title = t_list['name']
        list_html_url = TWITTER_LIST_HTML_URL % {'username': username, 'list': t_list['slug']}
        list_xml_url = TWITTER_LIST_FEED_URL % {'username': username, 'list': t_list['slug']}
        print OPML_OUTLINE_FEED % {'title': list_title, 'html_url': list_html_url, 'xml_url': list_xml_url}

    print OPML_END

if __name__ == "__main__":
    username = sys.argv[-1]
    main(username)

You can download the Python script, twitterlistto_opml.py.gz.



RIM, You’re Done Here

Research In Motion is done. They’ll be bought in the next year or so, their products will roll into whoever buys them – Microsoft, most probably – and they’ll go the way of Nokia, Danger, and countless other mobile platforms. They’ll exist independently for a while and then be subsumed. It’s over.


So, That’s the End of Bitcoin Then

No, the doesn’t necessarily mean the end of the Bitcoin experiment, but it’s a pretty good indication of it. For there are certain things that we want from a currency. A medium of exchange, a store of value, we’d also like to it be liquid and security is important as well. No currency can have all of these features (and humans have used some pretty odd things as currency over the centuries, from copper sheets to cowrie shells via butter, salt, gold, silver and even pieces of paper with Dead Presidents on them, surely the final lunacy?) to perfection but a currency which doesn’t have any of them in appreciable quantities isn’t going to last very long.

As I said this morning on Twitter:

Don't worry Bitcoin will bounce back. It's based on the drug trade now. So as long as there is a "war on drugs" it will be successful.less than a minute ago via Twitterrific for Mac Favorite Retweet Reply